London: Press Complaint: #Grenfelltowerfire Stop Tabloids Identifying Vulnerable People #Respecttheirprivacyingrief

I was disgusted to see tabloids naming the person who owned the fridge that caught fire in the Grenfell Tower fire. This included The Sun, The Daily Mirror and The Daily Mail, others also followed suit.

As a citizen journalist, there’s a fine line between telling an important story and putting vulnerable people at risk. It is extremely insensitive. This man is in grief and shock and he is not allowed privacy in such a time. This is inhumane. What kind of world are we in?

This will cause extra psychological trauma to the person, who not only could get PTSD but could be at risk of suicide, which will also affect the rest of his family too, if he doesn’t have a good support network. He has a child too. As a writer, we have to stand up to unethical behaviour like this.

Maybe they took the photo from a Facebook account, and tabloids would say, “well, it’s ‘his fault’ he made it public”Come on guys, you have degrees in journalism, surely you have some common sense. Why aren’t the police protecting this guy too?

I am a citizen journalist who has an interest in trauma and mental health. Perhaps these journalists should have some Mental Health First Aid training and learn about mental health. Even they themselves, may need counselling and could be vulnerable too after witnessesing this. I wonder if they are getting any help? Anyone who experiences such overwhelming trauma needs a lot of support, love and self-care, not ‘shaming in the media’ so media organisations can get huge profits.

Several members of the public, both in the UK, and worldwide, have complained on various forums about their behaviour. Some professional journalists, seem to have no duty of care to those they write about. Some QCs online are also disgusted.

If I knew him, I would offer him a cup of tea and a chat, and try and get him some trauma counselling. It will take years and years to deal with that. I hope he is surrounded by ‘friends’ that don’t sell him’ to the gutter media’.

If you are a professional journalist reading this, come on, show some balls and tell your boss to ‘stick it’ if they make you identify a vulnerable person like this.

To make a Press Complaint
: https://www.ipso.co.uk/make-a-complaint/

For those who need help after the Grenfell Tower Fire, here are some useful numbers

Mind Charity (for Mental Health) 0300 123 3393

Child Bereavement Uk, if parents etc have lost a child. UK Tel 01494 568 900

Cruse Bereavement Care 0808 808 1677

Winston’s Wish (The Charity for Bereaved Children) FREEPHONE
08088 020 021

The Guardian complain about identifing the person but flash up the Daily Mail with their tweet identifying him, here (which is ironic). https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/jun/16/mail-online-story-about-alleged-cause-of-grenfell-fire-prompts-more-than-1100-complaints?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+theguardian%2FIOlg+%28Media+%7C+The+Guardian%29

Ironically if the Royals behave badly, the Press censors their photos. Identifying vulnerable people is ‘an attack on the poor, the superrich who can afford gaggling clauses.

Homemade Mango Yoghurt & ‘Rum’ Ice Lolly – Review

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This was recommended to me by a Kentish woman who works at a fruit stall in England. Sometimes we swap recipes. Instead of milk, I used almond milk which I thought would be healthier. It gels the ingredients well together. I used a couple of lolly moulds.

INGREDIENTS (eyeball)

Ripe mango – chopped

Natural Yoghurt

To sweeten: Sugar or honey

Almond or Oat Milk

Drops of rum flavouring (sometimes Eastern European shops have this)

METHOD
: Just mix up!

Review: 9/10 Very nice! It was slightly cheesy at first, but in a nice Icelandic Skyr way. Far nicer than the ones in the shops too. Personally I preferred a bit of sugar, but that’s me. The lolly took about 10 minutes to eat. I gave one to my friend, who also enjoyed it. I find the ice lollies in the shops far too rich for me, and they’re not very fruity.

Tip: Some chopped almonds would be fun to add and would work very well with the almond milk.

Company Greed: Taxi Companies charging Full Rates for Grenfell Fire donors

An unnamed taxi driver driving into Notting Hill has been charging people full price to whose who have been giving large donations to the Grenfell Fire survivors to avoid getting ‘abuse from his company’.

The Metropolitan police say that 17 people were killed, including children, in the devastating Grenfell Fire, in Notting Hill, London, this week.

UPDATE: 15/5 Some cabbies are offering discounts or their services for free unlike the cabbie who charged £37.00 http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/grenfell-disaster-black-cab-and-uber-drivers-join-charge-to-help-victims-as-londoners-unite-in-a3566316.html

Notting Hill: Grenfell Fire: Nine British Red Cross Volunteers helping out

The British Red Cross have been providing Grenfell Fire survivors with food and water.

They say that nine volunteers are helping to distribute clothing, food and water donated by members of the public to people affected by the blaze at Grenfell Tower, in north Kensington.

Jon Pewtner, Red Cross senior emergency response officer, said: “Nine volunteers from the British Red Cross are providing practical and emotional support, including breakfast items, at a rest centre for residents”

They currently state that they have enough donations but advise the public that the Westway Trust needs large plastic containers to store donations for the GrenfellTower residents.

If you would like to fundraise for the Red Cross see http://www.redcross.org.uk/Donate-Now/Donation-enquiries

DIY British Sherbet: Review

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I made some sherbet today and I wanted to test it out.

Now, I am an aunt, so ‘I have to do ‘aunt things’ and get into practice for when I need it.

I was inspired by a stall selling sherbet at a Food Fair at Syon Park. They did lots of flavours, including pizza (which I am still working on). This particular recipe is a ‘plain one’ other than a few sprinkles. If you add liquid, like coconut flavouring, there will be a ‘fizzy reaction’. The photo above was when I put flavouring in it, so it is a bit ‘ball’ like but you don’t need to use any flavouring so it will be more powdery looking.

In the UK, sherbet is traditional eaten with a stick of licorice or eaten with the fingers. Nowadays, cooks use it as a topping for ice creams.

INGREDIENTS

Citrus Acid powder (I got this online, but you can apparently get it at pharmacies)

Bicarbonate of Soda

Sprinkles and/or edible glitter (from a cake decoration shop)This adds a little texture and colour if you want it.

Icing Sugar (be generous)

Vintage Sweet Bags (You can get a good range, blue, green, yellow, black and ‘mixed’ on Amazon.

Optional: Licorice sticks from Simpkins on Amazon (not licorice roots) If you can find a good health or candy store, even better as you don’t have to pay for any delivery charge.

Tip: You only need a little citrus acid powder and bicarbonate of soda. The more citrus acid you use, the more ‘sour’ it is.

REVIEW: It is not bad at all.You don’t need to buy sherbet in the shops now, it works! It is fun to have a variety of sprinkles to make it more unique and ‘homemadey’. I would give it a 9/10 and a Gold Star in ‘Aunt Points’

UK Blogger’s blood goes to The Royal Marsden Hospital

I gave blood in Kent a few weeks ago and recently I received a text from the NHS Blood Service, in the UK, saying where my blood donation went to.

The last time I gave blood, it went to the Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Kent, this time, it went somewhere else, The Royal Marsden Hospital, which is a famous hospital dedicated to cancer diagnosis, treatment, research and education. It was exciting to see where my blood travelled.

Today is also National Clean Air Day and many cancers are caused by air pollution and environmental hazards.

To celebrate National Clean Air Day, I will cycle to a local bicycle café and treat myself to a nice meal. We can all do our bit.

If you would like to give blood in the UK, make an appointment with the National Blood Service. You can call them on
0300 123 23 23 or make an appointment online on blood.co.uk – Tell me where your blood went too!

The Police 101 number kept me hanging on for over half an hour

I had to phone about an incident and I rang them for half an hour but there was no reply, other than ‘the police are very busy’. The same thing happened this morning. They are expected to answer within five minutes.

They encourage you to use the online service but when you go into the online service, for some incidents, you have to ring them on 101. It was like going round in circles.

Clearly there is a problem with understaffing, poor management and police cuts.

In the end, I resorted to good, old fashioned snail mail, and sent it First Class.

Drunk woman urinated on a Bermondsey street dressed as an ‘Angel’

A drunk woman was seen with two other giggling women, aged in their late twenties/thirties, peeing on a Bermondsey Street tonight. They were all dressed as angels.

The dirty incident happened near Bermondsey Tube Station, in broad daylight and near CCTV. The area is a regular ‘hotspot’ of non-toilet trained adults who come out from Bermondsey station, in Southwark.

Anti-social behaviour of this kind can be reported to the police https://beta.met.police.uk/report/antisocial-behaviour/report-street-drinking/?stepid=1-2-2

Dealing with a suicidal person from overseas on Facebook

I belong to a forum about people going through difficult things and we had one person on the forum who said she was going to commit suicide today on a Facebook post.

My Suicide Prevention Course ‘kicked in’. Generally when they give you a ‘date’ or if you find out when, you go into emergency mode. However, the online system where Facebook is supposed to help that person didn’t appear ‘to work’. Facebook also didn’t bother to reply on on Twitter.

In the end, myself and a few others messaged her, and I encouraged her to book an appointment with the GP, let us know when she had done this, and said that we are here for her. We were lucky that Facebook showed us roughly where she was and she had an unusual name.

In the meantime, I also contacted the South African police station near her (a very expensive mobile phone call from the UK) and told them what happened. I said I was calling from the UK and they ‘didn’t fuss about the paperwork like they do in the UK’ but just gone on with it.

I will never know if they contacted the person, as maybe it is hard to get the IP address from Facebook in time but I am glad I did it. One person contacted one of their relatives and asked them to check she was ok. Sometimes they were estranged, but I think sometimes this has to be done if the police find it hard to get hold of the suicidal person. The moderator was a bit slow at first but once she knew what was happening went into action.

We tried to get hold of her, keep her talking on the forum although at some point she went missing online for a while.

However, it turns out, after two hours, she said to the moderator that she felt ‘ok’ and was really amazed ‘that people online cared for her’ and provided telephone helplines etc.

Sometimes something simple like talking and caring can help people get past that suicidal feeling and we have to remember to say to the suicidal person ‘that the feeling is only temporary’.

World Crisis Hotlines https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines

Use Google Maps to find a police station round the world: https://www.google.co.uk/maps

I went up to London Bridge this afternoon.

Generally it was pretty much back to normal, bar more police and some road closures.

I said thank you to groups of police officers and staff at Network Rail for what they did during the #londonattack. The police said ‘they were just doing their job’ and ‘they didn’t mind doing longer shifts if it was the right thing to do’.

Parts of Borough Market was still cordoned off. London Bridge was open but it had new barriers along it.

One white woman of about twenty something saw a homeless person near the bridge and gave him £5.00. We remember that homeless Millwall fan, helped protect more people from being killed or injured during the attack. It was nice for the woman to do a random act of kindness.

Samaritans volunteers were out in force at London Bridge station.

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ABOVE: London Bridge now has barriers

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ABOVE: Flowers and tributes outside Evans Cycle Shop on London, a Muslim woman stood behind the flowers in deep thought.

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ABOVE: Victim Support leaflets on the flowers

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ABOVE: Victim Support leaflets being handed out by Police and Victim Support volunteers at London Bridge station.

Back to London Bridge 5 days after the #londonattack