Glastonbury Interview: Some teenage revellers ‘minutes from death’, says Good Samaritan festival goer

One regular Glastonbury goer is shocked how many young people have been really sick and vulnerable when visiting Glastonbury, mostly due to drugs and alcohol poisoning.

He was telling me that one young woman was so drugged up that she was left by her friends in a puddle face down. Her so-called fair weather friends at Glastonbury just deserted her. Fortunately he had Mental Health First Training and knew what to do, and had managed to help save her.

He also said that at Glastonbury many security guards were not keeping an eye on reveller’s health and didn’t get any help for those clearly ill and had to step in when one reveller was extremely ill. Many security guards at Glastonbury are not even first aid or Mental Health First Aid trained and haven’t a clue what to do. They didn’t call for help at all.

The Good Samaritan (who was not Christian BTW), that there were not enough First Aid tents within the area, just outside, and this caused a lot of problems. Glastonbury is huge. And a heatwave makes it worse. He said the limited First Aid stalls were not designed for those who have mental health problems, when there clearly huge mental health drug issues still at Glastonbury.

He was disgusted at the number of revellers who stepped over, picked on for fun and ignored those who were clearly vulnerable and ‘out of it’. It was strange that many Glastonbury festival goers completely ignored people who are clearly suffering.

When he tried to help the young person who had fallen down in the puddle, he got abuse from his own ‘friends’ who were annoyed that he was helping her, as it was ‘inconvenient’ to them. Yes, he even got abuse. He ignored his ‘friends’ and continued to help her. The selfishness of many people at the event was staggering. Ironically many of them appear to be Corbynites by the level of press videos. You would think they would actually care about their own kind!

He said that when some people are out of it, they should talk to the person calmly, get them to focus on you all the time, and say their name until they come round from their ‘trip’, though this could take hours. If no one does this, they will be out of it and vulnerable again.

At one Glastonbury festival he went to, he was horrified that a woman had been attacked at the festival by a sex predator. There are people going round the festival deliberately ‘targeting’ young and vulnerable revellers.

He said that each visitor this year was security-checked for seven minutes, but he thinks this was more for ‘terrorism-related’ issues, but this must have ‘freaked out’ the regular drug dealers who prey on thousands of Glastonbury visitors each year.

He believes that there should be Mental Health First Aiders at Glastonbury that and that security guards should get First Aid training at the very least.
Parents should really know what is happening there. I would also back this up, but I would also add that nowadays there are many Drug & Alcohol Free Festivals people can go to instead, and have a good time, rather than a bad time, and possible death. These ‘healthier festivals’ seem to be growing all the time. Being ill and vulnerable is not fun. Saying No to drugs is the best thing and know your alcohol level so that you are always in full control. Looking after your friends, and not deserting them would be a good thing too. There is a big Elephant in the Room at this festival. This is something that is being ‘ignored in the mass media’.

Many young people, not all, are still very vulnerable, wanting to try new things, but they don’t have the knowledge as my own nephew has experienced, as he was killed trying drugs at eighteen last year. They still don’t ‘get it’. Many young people take stupid risks, because they are pressurised by ‘flash friends’ who desert them when they are in trouble. You can have a good time without them.

The media may have got a Glastonbury freebie and ‘had to write about something, so they ended up writing about Jeremy Corbyn, and the litter (though this is a good thing), but perhaps they should visit the overwhelmed First Aid tents and also speak to the police, to find out some real news and see if their professional journalists can help make the Event a safer place for all.

USEFUL LINKS

DRUGS AND SUMMER FESTIVALS: https://teens.drugabuse.gov/blog/post/summer-music-festivals

DRUGS SEIZED AT BRITISH FESTIVALS https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/may/21/music-festivals-drugs

DRUGS AND FESTIVAL ORGANISERS’ RESPONSIBILITIES: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/meghan-ralston/music-festival-drug-use_b_3653830.html

ALCOHOL FREE FESTIVALS https://www.everfest.com/magazine/8-alcohol-free-festivals-that-know-how-to-party

MAN KILLED AFTER SUSPECTED REACTION TO TAKING DRUG KETAMINE, A TRANQUILLIZER FOR HORSES TAKEN AT GLASTO(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/glastonbury/10930469/Glastonbury-man-dies-after-suspected-reaction-to-ketamine.html

LICENSING: Contact Somerset County Council http://www.somerset.gov.uk/

In Kent, however, there is a big alcohol problem with the young so much so that one Alcohol & Drug Free Festival in Headcorn, has had to be cancelled due to ‘lack of interest’ http://www.kentonline.co.uk/weald/news/drink-and-drug-free-festival-cancelled-40996/ Some people in Britain are unable to have ‘fun’ without alcohol. drugs and all the horrible stuff that goes with it.

Grenfell Tower Fire: Press Complaints Poll: Results so far

I asked if Twitter followers have complained to IPSOS, the Independent Press Standards Complaints Organisation, about the appalling standard of tabloid journalism on the Grenfell Tower Fire.

Here are some results so far:

Have you made a complaint to IPSOS? 25% Yes

I won’t make a Complaint: 63%

0% Don’t know

12% Not Yet

If you would like to make a complaint about to IPSOs about the tabloids insensitive behaviour, the website is https://www.ipso.co.uk/make-a-complaint/

London: Press Complaint: #Grenfelltowerfire Stop Tabloids Identifying Vulnerable People #Respecttheirprivacyingrief

I was disgusted to see tabloids naming the person who owned the fridge that caught fire in the Grenfell Tower fire. This included The Sun, The Daily Mirror and The Daily Mail, others also followed suit.

As a citizen journalist, there’s a fine line between telling an important story and putting vulnerable people at risk. It is extremely insensitive. This man is in grief and shock and he is not allowed privacy in such a time. This is inhumane. What kind of world are we in?

This will cause extra psychological trauma to the person, who not only could get PTSD but could be at risk of suicide, which will also affect the rest of his family too, if he doesn’t have a good support network. He has a child too. As a writer, we have to stand up to unethical behaviour like this.

Maybe they took the photo from a Facebook account, and tabloids would say, “well, it’s ‘his fault’ he made it public”Come on guys, you have degrees in journalism, surely you have some common sense. Why aren’t the police protecting this guy too?

I am a citizen journalist who has an interest in trauma and mental health. Perhaps these journalists should have some Mental Health First Aid training and learn about mental health. Even they themselves, may need counselling and could be vulnerable too after witnessesing this. I wonder if they are getting any help? Anyone who experiences such overwhelming trauma needs a lot of support, love and self-care, not ‘shaming in the media’ so media organisations can get huge profits.

Several members of the public, both in the UK, and worldwide, have complained on various forums about their behaviour. Some professional journalists, seem to have no duty of care to those they write about. Some QCs online are also disgusted.

If I knew him, I would offer him a cup of tea and a chat, and try and get him some trauma counselling. It will take years and years to deal with that. I hope he is surrounded by ‘friends’ that don’t sell him’ to the gutter media’.

If you are a professional journalist reading this, come on, show some balls and tell your boss to ‘stick it’ if they make you identify a vulnerable person like this.

To make a Press Complaint
: https://www.ipso.co.uk/make-a-complaint/

For those who need help after the Grenfell Tower Fire, here are some useful numbers

Mind Charity (for Mental Health) 0300 123 3393

Child Bereavement Uk, if parents etc have lost a child. UK Tel 01494 568 900

Cruse Bereavement Care 0808 808 1677

Winston’s Wish (The Charity for Bereaved Children) FREEPHONE
08088 020 021

The Guardian complain about identifing the person but flash up the Daily Mail with their tweet identifying him, here (which is ironic). https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/jun/16/mail-online-story-about-alleged-cause-of-grenfell-fire-prompts-more-than-1100-complaints?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+theguardian%2FIOlg+%28Media+%7C+The+Guardian%29

Ironically if the Royals behave badly, the Press censors their photos. Identifying vulnerable people is ‘an attack on the poor, the superrich who can afford gaggling clauses.

Prince Harry & Bereavement as a Child

As someone who experienced bereavement as a child at similar ages to Prince Harry, this is just a big subject, and not really discussed normally in the mainstream media.

Like him, as a young teenager, me and my brother had absolutely no one to talk to when my dad suddenly died o f a stroke, shortly before Christmas. I still remember the presents we had got him, and his empty seat,  and suddenly having an aunt turn up at the Christmas meal; she bought us the Christmas tree, that  my dad would have put up. It was pretty hard for me as my dad was more of a friend, and we had similar sense of humour and interests, and he was really laid back. Some people said the stroke could have caused by the war, he was shot twice in Sicily, few places that anyone would get out alive apparently, though he did take pills for high blood pressure despite eating fairly healthily. I remember the weird seriousness of the ambulance workers and the ‘look’ the doctor gave us, it didn’t look good. My life changed at seven o’clock one morning. As kids, we only visited him twice, I think any more, would have been all too much. I remember holding his hand, a farmers’ hand,  but he was quite sedated. I still remember the hand, it was my last ever contact with my dad. Things just went into remote control, our emotions left us.

The schools didn’t help at all, nor any religious organisations, nothing, and I went to a so-called religious school.  Pupils didn’t help either, they were pretty bad.. We never got a condolence card, nothing.  We had absolutely no support. It was years later when it really affected me.  I don’t really want to go into detail about it on this blog, but I have been a speaker on this subject at medical conferences where it is a little safer to talk.. It was difficult, but I did it, memories did some back, so it wasn’t a long speech. I had not even planned the speech, just went up and talked!

People still don’t talk about. it, but they should, as best they can. Sudden bereavement can happen to anyone. When your dad dies, we felt like we had stopped becoming ‘kids’, we grew up pretty quickly and knew what really mattered in life.

From my own experience, these are some of my tips:-

  1. Get schools more involved in this issue, teachers and pupils need to be understanding and supportive.
  2. Get kids who have been bereaved  involved in brilliant charities like Winston’s Wish, where they can talk and meet others who have done through the same thing. When I cycled to Paris, some of my money went towards this charity, years later.
  3. Parents encourage their kids to get some counselling if they want it.
  4. Distraction techniques – get a puppy, or something that creates a positive new chapter in their life.
  5. Talk about it, share tips and way of coping.
  6.  Focus on something, for me it was sport.
  7. If you have kids, make a will (include the kids) and have life insurance.
  8. Keep things as stable as possible. We were lucky, we didn’t have to move or anything and my dad never had life insurance. We just about hung on financially.