DIY British Sherbet: Review

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I made some sherbet today and I wanted to test it out.

Now, I am an aunt, so ‘I have to do ‘aunt things’ and get into practice for when I need it.

I was inspired by a stall selling sherbet at a Food Fair at Syon Park. They did lots of flavours, including pizza (which I am still working on). This particular recipe is a ‘plain one’ other than a few sprinkles. If you add liquid, like coconut flavouring, there will be a ‘fizzy reaction’. The photo above was when I put flavouring in it, so it is a bit ‘ball’ like but you don’t need to use any flavouring so it will be more powdery looking.

In the UK, sherbet is traditional eaten with a stick of licorice or eaten with the fingers. Nowadays, cooks use it as a topping for ice creams.

INGREDIENTS

Citrus Acid powder (I got this online, but you can apparently get it at pharmacies)

Bicarbonate of Soda

Sprinkles and/or edible glitter (from a cake decoration shop)This adds a little texture and colour if you want it.

Icing Sugar (be generous)

Vintage Sweet Bags (You can get a good range, blue, green, yellow, black and ‘mixed’ on Amazon.

Optional: Licorice sticks from Simpkins on Amazon (not licorice roots) If you can find a good health or candy store, even better as you don’t have to pay for any delivery charge.

Tip: You only need a little citrus acid powder and bicarbonate of soda. The more citrus acid you use, the more ‘sour’ it is.

REVIEW: It is not bad at all.You don’t need to buy sherbet in the shops now, it works! It is fun to have a variety of sprinkles to make it more unique and ‘homemadey’. I would give it a 9/10 and a Gold Star in ‘Aunt Points’

World Narcissist Abuse Awareness Day 1 June 2017

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Narcissistic Abuse Awareness Day (WNAAD) occurs on June 1st every year. Established in 2016, WNAAD is a growing global movement dedicated to raising the profile of narcissistic abuse, providing public education, resources for survivors, and effect policy change. WNAAD is an international event that is recognized worldwide.

Many of the people who suffer from narcissistic abuse (a form of psychological and emotional abuse) aren’t even aware that what they are experiencing is a legitimate form of abuse, and when they become aware they are being abused, they have a difficult time describing it because it’s so hard to put the finger on. So much of it can be covert.

WNAAD came up with the hashtag, #IfMyWoundsWereVisible, because unlike physical abuse where a single strike or blow, narcissist abuse is generally invisible. An indiscernible assault on the spirit, identity, and the psyche of the victim. The impact is cumulative, and its full effect isn’t felt until the damage is extensive. Although bruises and broken bones heal much faster than a broken spirit, narcissistic abuse tends to go unnoticed.

Narcissist Abuse is controlling, anti-social and manipulative behaviour. Narcissist abuse is experienced everywhere, workplaces, religious groups, education, not for profits, in the armed forces, and families.

It is also important that those in Human Resources know about narcissist abuse in the workplace, often the victim is not believed.

People need to learn about ‘Red Flags’ before they enter into a relationship with someone and recognize them in workplaces early on, and learn how to handle them and avoid them. Many people living or working in close proximity to full on narcissists have had to leave their family or place of work, some have had Complex PTSD because of the abuse.

My own experience of narcissist abuse experience ranges from emotional neglect, lack of empathy from the abuser , abnormal hostile behaviour ‘behind closed doors’ at home or in the workplace, smear campaigns, emotional blackmail, secretive behaviour, mind games – the abuser makes everything your fault, financial blackmail, lack of support by fellow colleague or family member, anti social behaviour, passive aggressiveness, covert, controlling and public humiliating behaviour, violence and betrayal. Walking on eggshells every day too. Both men and women can be narcissists, and many people have parents and siblings who are ‘narcs’.

Some red flags in a relationship, for example, according to WNAAD.com:

◾As the relationship becomes more established, you may start to see some stronger warning signs, or red flags, such as: You may spot bigger lies, and when you confront them, you never get a straight answer or they will turn it around and accuse you of what they’re actually doing.

◾If you try to raise an issue with them, it becomes a full-blown argument. They may accuse you of causing the fight, or they may use the silent treatment as a way of punishing you for confronting them.
◾Arguments feel circular and nonsensical. You’re left feeling emotionally battered and confused. There is no resolution to the issue, no sense of compromise or seeking a win/win outcome. It feels like they need to “win” regardless of the issue or what’s at stake. You’re left you feeling unsupported and misunderstood.

◾They may tell you something didn’t happen when you know it did, or vice versa. This is called gaslighting and it’s designed to make you doubt your own reality and judgment.

◾You feel like you need to ask for permission before making plans with others. They may try to control where you go, or call and text constantly to check up on you, and interrogate you about where you’ve been/what you’ve been doing.

◾You start seeing less of your family and friends. Perhaps because they openly prevent you from doing so through guilt tripping or threats of abandonment. Or, it could be more subtle, where they make such a fuss about seeing your family and friends that you start avoiding them so you don’t have to deal with the fallout. You end up feeling isolated and lonely.

◾The relationship feels one-sided – like you are the one who is doing all the giving, the one who is always in the wrong, the one who is trying the hardest, changing the most or doing the most sacrificing, just to make them happy. And it still doesn’t work. Nothing is enough for them.

◾You can’t feel at ease or relaxed in their presence. You feel like you’re walking on eggshells, waiting for the next time they lash out at you. You realize you feel a sense of relief when they aren’t there.

◾You feel like whatever you do, it’s not enough. You’re manipulated so that your flaws and vulnerabilities are exploited and used against you at every opportunity. You begin to feel inadequate, unlovable, and like everything is all your fault.

Sign up to the official website for free on http://www.wnaad.com/ and learn about symptoms and how to spot red flags and follow the hashtag #ifmywoundswerevisible. You will be surprised by how many people you know who have it.

There are some good books on Narcissists on Amazon, and one of them is ‘My Narcissist Mother’ https://www.amazon.co.uk/My-Narcissistic-Mother-narcissistic-mother-ebook/dp/B015R9YQHG/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1498224587&sr=8-12&keywords=narcissistic+mother (I have not been paid to recommend this book)

Mental Health Awareness Week: The Daily Mirror and the Duchess of Cambridge with the Anxious Child

I was disturbed to see the photograph of the young child who was seen suffering from anxiety whilst meeting the Duchess of Campaign.

When you see a child with lack of self-esteem, you need to ‘dig deeper’ and find out why and how he can be supported. There could be many reasons why the child experienced this condition, what was his home situation like, did he have pushy parents,what about his schooling, and how he gets on with teachers and fellow school kids. All sorts of things.

The Daily Mirror said he ‘was shy’ but there is a difference between being shy and having a social anxiety attack. And being ‘shy’ is ok, many people are shy. Why be humoured for being shy? Being photographed globally for being ‘shy’ as a ‘bad thing’ adds shame to people. Maybe the kid will deal with it ok when they get older, but many people are shy or have social anxiety for life. It is just a condition, and nothing to be ashamed of, despite our society being made for extroverts.

The close shot photo of the child, splashed over the pages, of the internet with his name would make things worse of a child with social anxiety, as humiliation is part of the condition. The media are often ignorant of mental health and often have no training in Mental Health First Aid.

As it is Mental Awareness Week the media and parents need to learn about social anxiety and how to manage it.

I suffered from social anxiety as a child so I see the photograph as ‘troubling’. If I was a parent or teacher, I would prefer to encourage self-esteem and confidence in a child. Sometimes they just need a bit of support. I would also get a child psychologist in.

If you have a child with similar symptoms to the little boy, please read the link on NHS link http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-anxiety/Pages/Social-anxiety.aspx#children

I’m an Aunty, and I am not happy!

Last week I became an Aunty.

I come from a ‘super child-free’ household with a child-free attitude so the whole thing was a bit of a shock.

You see all these Youtube videos of women screaming, delighted that they will be an Aunty, but it is taboo subject, that  some new aunties, are not pleased. Even some child-free aunties are delighted for various reasons.

I also felt sad that the new parents would now have to fork out £250,000 over 18 years or more and have all the stress of having a kid and not have any time for themselves.  It would be a drain on the planet and resources. 

Anyway, it turns out that my supposedly childfree  brother, who in his late forties, secretly married his girlfriend overseas a few months ago, and last week, I was presented with a* secret* baby! Yes, is like something out of a soap opera.My head has been going round in circles ever since.

Apparently the baby was born early in Spring and they kept it quiet for a month.The grandparents knew about all of this but no one told me, the sister. They mumbled when I asked when they got married. When asked why they didn’t tell me, they just said ‘they couldn’t find the right moment’.

I couldn’t believe the baby was theirs at first. The ‘girlfriend’ wore baggy clothes throughout. I thought my brother was joking, but they showed wedding photos and a photo of his new wife in the hospital. So I have a new sister-in-law too. I am supposed to be suddenly ‘delighted’.I have a lot to digest

I am still very hurt that they failed to tell me about all this earlier and the secrecy was very cruel.They only told me ‘when they had to’ and that was when the baby was born. I mean, who does that?

After our get together over a coffee,they reminded me when his birthday was and ‘suggested’ that I should get the baby presents.They also said I could make booties. (Perhaps if they told me earlier, then I would have had some ready). Now, I feel they want to ‘use me’for freeloading presents. I am not really a bootie-making person and I am not maternal whatsoever. Maybe I will take the child out doing something interesting when they reach a toilet-trained age, ,but I can’t think of what else I would do.I am a busy person… agggh!

They  also knew my thoughts of babysitting and I always said that I wouldn’t do it. I am just not baby-minded, not every woman is.

I know I will I have to do something as an aunty, but I am not really sure what that will be, I just hope that will be a lot less than most aunties!